1.2. Эй ты, нюня, куда спряталась? | BookTitres.com

0,678231 1,377324 1
1,476417 2,893878 2
3,332200 5,198639 3
5,527211 8,680726 4
9,378458 11,075283 5
11,423810 12,382313 6
12,660998 14,607256 7
15,045578 16,353288 8
16,921315 18,338776 9
18,328118 22,200000 10
23,167120 24,804082 11
24,893197 25,522449 12
26,040590 29,613152 13
29,941723 32,307029 14
32,446032 35,559637 15
35,898186 39,341043 16
39,948980 42,623583 17
43,460998 45,207710 18
45,456463 49,644116 19
50,614739 51,782766 22
51,881859 54,042962 23
54,775283 58,008617 25
58,407029 59,435374 26
60,173016 61,819955 27
62,597506 64,613605 28
64,712698 68,554649 29
69,192517 72,146485 30
72,345351 74,900227 31
75,268707 77,624036 32
77,703175 80,138322 33
80,466893 83,231293 34
83,290476 85,815420 35
86,373469 89,137868 36
89,087302 90,504762 37
90,633787 94,126531 38
94,564853 96,421315 39
96,670068 99,324717 40
99,693197 101,679365 41
102,686395 104,383220 42
104,462358 109,572642 43
109,860091 113,153288 45
113,252381 115,996825 46
116,075964 119,429025 47
119,767574 122,140773 48
123,020181 126,323356 50
126,631973 128,338776 52
128,817007 130,753288 53
131,091837 132,988209 54
133,097279 134,794104 55
134,923129 136,220862 56
136,788889 138,705215 57
139,043764 142,875737 58
143,523583 146,726984 59
146,776190 150,149206 60
150,298186 151,516100 61
152,243764 156,574603 62
156,973016 160,365986 63
160,594785 163,199546 64
163,288662 166,112925 65
166,371655 168,976417 66
169,584354 172,867574 67
173,206122 178,684354 68
179,152608 180,889342 69
181,038322 187,165079 70
187,792971 190,417687 71
190,776190 192,702494 72
193,021088 194,258957 73
194,308163 195,156916 74
196,153968 197,162358 75
197,181633 201,442612 76
202,260091 205,842630 78
206,161224 206,720635 79
207,109070 210,378246 80
210,471429 214,283447 82
215,290476 217,290718 83
217,367353 219,651074 83-1
219,969841 224,001361 84
224,978458 226,924717 85
227,452834 228,188207 86
228,949433 229,878005 87
230,765306 231,753741 88
232,820635 235,385488 89
236,133107 238,488435 90
238,607483 241,052608 91
241,221542 242,359637 92
242,468707 244,020986 93
244,264626 245,851701 94
245,880952 248,803007 95
248,879642 253,324468 95-1
253,623356 256,208163 96
256,297279 257,435374 97
257,524490 259,121542 98
259,220635 260,837642 99
261,186168 264,708844 100
265,446485 266,365079 101
266,633787 269,408163 102
269,886395 274,436735 103
274,475964 277,250340 104
277,718594 279,205896 105
279,444671 280,802268 106
280,951247 281,889796 107
281,968934 282,957370 108
283,066440 285,681179 109
286,049660 287,187755 110
287,207029 288,514739 111
288,573923 290,921572 112
290,982880 292,675283 115
293,442857 295,668481 116
295,707710 296,546485 117
296,775283 298,292517 118
298,411565 300,128345 119
300,337188 302,612698 120
303,270522 305,675737 121
305,774830 307,790930 122
307,700454 309,117914 123
309,446485 311,741950 124
311,751247 314,176417 125
315,043764 316,870295 126-127
317,069161 317,878005 128
318,056916 319,793651 129
319,952608 322,687075 130
322,925850 324,782313 131
325,054775 326,288889 133
327,096372 328,693424 134
328,952154 331,297506 135
331,376644 333,282993 136
333,671429 336,535601 137
336,914059 340,366893 138
340,416100 343,018006 139
343,479138 346,502948 141
346,512245 348,628118 142
349,305896 351,681179 143
351,790249 352,808617 144
352,797959 354,454875 145
354,623810 356,230839 146
356,719048 357,867120 147
358,085941 360,950113 148
360,969388 362,307029 149
362,535828 366,437642 150
366,656463 367,648477 151
367,783900 369,021769 153
369,625658 373,331973 155
374,029705 377,103401 156
377,771202 379,649509 157
379,916327 381,653061 159
381,652381 383,219501 160
384,063682 386,222676 161
386,611111 388,263277 162
390,621995 391,859864 163
«Boh!
Madam Mope!»
cried the voice of John Reed;
then he paused: he found the room apparently empty.
«Where the dickens is she!»
he continued.
«Lizzy! Georgy!
(calling to his sisters)
Joan is not here:
tell mama she is run out into the rain—bad animal!»
«It is well I drew the curtain,»
thought I;
and I wished fervently he might not discover my hiding-place:
nor would John Reed have found it out himself;
he was not quick either of vision or conception;
but Eliza just put her head in at the door, and said at once —
«She is in the window-seat, to be sure, Jack.»
And I came out immediately,
for I trembled at the idea of being dragged forth by the said Jack.
«What do you want?»
I asked, with awkward diffidence.
«Say, ‘What do you want, Master Reed?'»
was the answer.
«I want you to come here;»
and seating himself in an arm-chair,
he intimated by a gesture that I was to approach and stand before him.
John Reed was a schoolboy of fourteen years old;
four years older than I, for I was but ten:
large and stout for his age,
with a dingy and unwholesome skin;
thick lineaments in a spacious visage,
heavy limbs and large extremities.
He gorged himself habitually at table,
which made him bilious,
and gave him a dim and bleared eye and flabby cheeks.
He ought now to have been at school;
but his mama had taken him home for a month or two,
«on account of his delicate health.»
Mr. Miles, the master,
affirmed that he would do very well if he had fewer cakes and sweetmeats sent him from home;
but the mother’s heart turned from an opinion so harsh,
and inclined rather to the more refined idea
that John’s sallowness was owing to over-application
and, perhaps, to pining after home.
John had not much affection for his mother and sisters,
and an antipathy to me.
He bullied and punished me;
not two or three times in the week,
nor once or twice in the day,
but continually:
every nerve I had feared him,
and every morsel of flesh in my bones shrank when he came near.
There were moments when I was bewildered by the terror he inspired,
because I had no appeal whatever against either his menaces
or his inflictions;
the servants did not like to offend their young master by taking my part against him,
and Mrs. Reed was blind and deaf on the subject:
she never saw him strike or heard him abuse me,
though he did both now and then in her very presence,
more frequently, however, behind her back.
Habitually obedient to John, I came up to his chair:
he spent some three minutes in thrusting out his tongue at me as far as he could without damaging the roots:
I knew he would soon strike,
and while dreading the blow, I mused on the disgusting and ugly appearance of him who would presently deal it.
I wonder if he read that notion in my face;
for, all at once, without speaking,
he struck suddenly
and strongly.
I tottered,
and on regaining my equilibrium retired back a step or two from his chair.
«That is for your impudence in answering mama awhile since,»
said he,
«and for your sneaking way of getting behind curtains,
and for the look you had in your eyes two minutes since, you rat!»
Accustomed to John Reed’s abuse,
I never had an idea of replying to it;
my care was how to endure the blow which would certainly follow the insult.
«What were you doing behind the curtain?»
he asked.
«I was reading.»
«Show the book.»
I returned to the window and fetched it thence.
«You have no business to take our books;
you are a dependent, mama says;
you have no money;
your father left you none;
you ought to beg,
and not to live here with gentlemen’s children like us,
and eat the same meals we do, and wear clothes at our mama’s expense.
Now, I’ll teach you to rummage my bookshelves:
for they ARE mine;
all the house belongs to me,
or will do in a few years.
Go and stand by the door, out of the way of the mirror and the windows.»
I did so,
not at first aware what was his intention;
but when I saw him lift and poise the book and stand in act to hurl it,
I instinctively started aside with a cry of alarm:
not soon enough, however;
the volume was flung,
it hit me,
and I fell,
striking my head against the door and cutting it.
The cut bled,
the pain was sharp:
my terror had passed its climax;
other feelings succeeded.
«Wicked and cruel boy!»
I said.
«You are like a murderer—
you are like a slave-driver—
you are like the Roman emperors!»
I had read Goldsmith’s History of Rome,
and had formed my opinion of Nero,
Caligula, &c.
Also I had drawn parallels in silence,
which I never thought thus to have declared aloud.
«What! what!»
he cried.
«Did she say that to me?
Did you hear her, Eliza and Georgiana?
Won’t I tell mama?
but first—»
He ran headlong at me:
I felt him grasp my hair and my shoulder:
he had closed with a desperate thing.
I really saw in him a tyrant, a murderer.
I felt a drop or two of blood from my head trickle down my neck,
and was sensible of somewhat pungent suffering:
these sensations for the time predominated over fear,
and I received him in frantic sort.
I don’t very well know what I did with my hands,
but he called me
«Rat! Rat!»
and bellowed out aloud.
Aid was near him:
Eliza and Georgiana had run for Mrs. Reed,
who was gone upstairs:
she now came upon the scene, followed by Bessie and her maid Abbot.
We were parted:
I heard the words —
«Dear! dear! What a fury to fly at Master John!»
«Did ever anybody see such a picture of passion!»
Then Mrs. Reed subjoined —
«Take her away to the red-room,
and lock her in there.»
Four hands were immediately laid upon me,
and I was borne upstairs.
end of chapter one.
— Эй,
ты, нюня! —
раздался голос Джона Рида;
он замолчал: комната казалась пустой.
— Куда к чертям она запропастилась? —
продолжал он.
— Лиззи! Джорджи! —
позвал он сестер.
— Джоаны нет здесь.
Скажите мамочке, что она убежала под дождик… Экая гадина!
«Хорошо, что я задернула занавесы», —
подумала я,
горячо желая, чтобы мое убежище не было открыто,
впрочем, Джон Рид, ни за что бы его не обнаружил,
не отличавшийся ни особой зоркостью, ни особой сообразительностью,
но Элиза, едва просунув голову в дверь, сразу же заявила:
— Она на подоконнике, ручаюсь, Джон.
Я тотчас вышла из своего уголка;
больше всего я боялась, как бы меня оттуда не вытащил Джон.
— Что тебе нужно? —
спросила я с плохо разыгранным смирением.
— Скажи: «Что вам угодно, мистер Рид?» —
последовал ответ.
— Мне угодно, чтобы ты подошла ко мне, —
и, усевшись в кресло,
он показал жестом, что я должна подойти и стать перед ним.
Джону Риду исполнилось четырнадцать лет,
он был четырьмя годами старше меня, так как мне едва минуло десять.
Это был необычайно рослый для своих лет увалень
с прыщеватой кожей и нездоровым цветом лица;
поражали его крупные нескладные черты
и большие ноги и руки.
За столом он постоянно объедался,
и от этого у него был мутный,
бессмысленный взгляд и дряблые щеки.
Собственно говоря, ему следовало сейчас быть в школе,
но мамочка взяла его на месяц-другой домой
«по причине слабого здоровья».
Мистер Майлс, его учитель,
утверждал, что в этом нет никакой необходимости, — пусть ему только поменьше присылают из дому пирожков и пряников;
но материнское сердце возмущалось столь грубым объяснением
и склонялось к более благородной версии,
приписывавшей бледность мальчика переутомлению,
а может быть, и тоске по родному дому.
Джон не питал особой привязанности к матери и сестрам,
меня же он просто ненавидел.
Он запугивал меня и тиранил;
и это не два-три раза в неделю
и даже не раз или два в день,
а беспрестанно.
Каждым нервом я боялась его
и трепетала каждой жилкой, едва он приближался ко мне.
Бывали минуты, когда я совершенно терялась от ужаса,
ибо у меня не было защиты ни от его угроз,
ни от его побоев;
слуги не захотели бы рассердить молодого барина, став на мою сторону,
а миссис Рид была в этих случаях слепа и глуха:
она никогда не замечала, что он бьет и обижает меня,
хотя он делал это не раз и в ее присутствии,
а впрочем, чаще за ее спиной.
Привыкнув повиноваться Джону, я немедленно подошла к креслу,
на котором он сидел; минуты три он развлекался тем, что показывал мне язык, стараясь высунуть его как можно больше.
Я знала, что вот сейчас он ударит меня,
и, с тоской ожидая этого, размышляла о том, какой он противный и безобразный.
Может быть, Джон прочел эти мысли на моем лице,
потому что вдруг, не говоря ни слова,
ударил меня резко
и сильно.
Я покачнулась,
но удержалась на ногах и отступила на шаг или два.
— Вот тебе за то, что ты надерзила маме, —
сказал он, —
и за то, что спряталась за шторы,
и за то, что так на меня посмотрела сейчас, ты, крыса!
Я привыкла к грубому обращению Джона Рида,
и мне в голову не приходило дать ему отпор;
я думала лишь о том, как бы вынести второй удар, который неизбежно должен был последовать за первым.
— Что ты делала за шторой? —
спросил он.
— Я читала.
— Покажи книжку.
Я взяла с окна книгу и принесла ему.
— Ты не смеешь брать наши книги;
мама говорит, что ты живешь у нас из милости;
ты нищенка,
твой отец тебе ничего не оставил;
тебе следовало бы милостыню просить,
а не жить с нами, детьми джентльмена,
есть то, что мы едим, и носить платья, за которые платит наша мама.
Я покажу тебе, как рыться в книгах.
Это мои книги!
Я здесь хозяин!
Или буду хозяином через несколько лет.
Пойди встань у дверей, подальше от окон и от зеркала.
Я послушалась,
сначала не догадываясь о его намерениях;
но когда я увидела, что он встал и замахнулся книгой, чтобы пустить ею в меня,
я испуганно вскрикнула и невольно отскочила,
однако недостаточно быстро:
толстая книга на лету,
задела меня,
я упала и,
ударившись о косяк двери, расшибла голову.
Из раны потекла кровь,
я почувствовала резкую боль,
и тут страх внезапно покинул меня,
дав место другим чувствам.
— Противный, злой мальчишка! —
крикнула я.
— Ты — как убийца,
как надсмотрщик над рабами,
ты — как римский император!
Я прочла «Историю Рима» Гольдсмита
и составила себе собственное представление о Нероне,
Калигуле и других тиранах.
Втайне я уже давно занималась сравнениями,
но никогда не предполагала, что выскажу их вслух.
— Что? Что? —
закричал он.
— Кого ты так называешь?..
Вы слышали, девочки?
Я скажу маме!
Но раньше…
Джон ринулся на меня;
я почувствовала, как он схватил меня за плечо и за волосы.
Однако перед ним было отчаянное существо.
Я действительно видела перед собой тирана, убийцу.
По моей шее одна за другой потекли капли крови,
я испытывала резкую боль.
Эти ощущения на время заглушили страх,
и я встретила Джона с яростью.
Я не вполне сознавала, что делают мои руки,
но он крикнул:
— Крыса! Крыса! —
и громко завопил.
Помощь была близка.
Элиза и Джорджиана побежали за миссис Рид,
которая ушла наверх;
она явилась, за ней следовали Бесси и камеристка Эббот.
Нас разняли,
и до меня донеслись слова:
— Ай-ай! Вот негодница, как она набросилась на мастера Джона!
— Этакая злоба у девочки!
И, наконец, приговор миссис Рид:
— Уведите ее в красную комнату
и заприте там.
Четыре руки подхватили меня
и понесли наверх.
Конец первой главы.
1.2. Эй ты, нюня, куда спряталась?

Добавить комментарий