1.2. Что такое напильник и жратва знаешь? | BookTitres.com

0,517914000000019 6,28548799999999 158
6,63401399999998 10,625624 159
10,884354 14,207483 160
14,595918 17,400227 161
18,008163 19,575283 162
19,824036 20,563039 163
20,931519 24,164853 164
24,473469 26,479592 165
27,237188 28,105896 166
28,883447 31,298639 167
31,976417 32,895011 168
33,842177 37,245125 169
37,414059 40,856916 170
41,434921 43,590703 171
43,989116 45,296825 172
45,824943 47,761224 173
48,229478 49,756689 174
50,354649 52,40068 175
52,878912 55,004762 176
55,423129 58,197506 177
58,715646 60,262812 178-179
61,409524 63,295918 180
63,414966 66,378912 181
66,418141 67,207029 182
67,715193 70,798866 183
70,718367 71,387528 184
71,606349 73,442857 185
73,621769 75,508163 186
76,744671 82,312698 188
82,840816 87,371202 189
87,540136 89,885488 190
90,423583 91,791156 191
91,860317 93,726757 192
93,895692 95,84195 193
96,190476 97,827438 194
98,006349 100,311791 195
100,610431 101,578912 196
101,558277 104,133107 197
104,2322 108,992063 198
109,360544 111,456463 199
111,655329 113,471882 200
114,169615 115,327664 201
115,596372 118,859637 202
119,148299 121,463719 203
121,592744 124,975737 204
124,935147 126,781633 205
127,279819 127,929025 206
128,078005 129,495465 207
129,504762 131,271429 208
131,839456 133,955329 209
134,084354 137,796599 210
138,364626 141,568027 211
141,916553 145,95805 212
146,037188 147,743991 213
147,763265 150,537642 214
151,255329 153,361224 215
153,470295 156,524036 216
156,88254 159,048299 217
159,187302 161,043764 218
161,28254 163,059184 219
163,228118 165,842857 220
166,101587 168,92585 221
169,254422 173,315873 222
173,454875 174,912245 223
175,510204 179,89093 224
179,920181 181,736735 225
182,155102 187,154422 226
187,612698 188,411565 227
188,819955 190,506803 228
192,002721 194,517687 229
194,586848 197,670522 230
197,879365 200,663719 231
201,501134 204,27551 232
204,624036 205,43288 233
206,419955 207,647846 234
207,707029 208,904989 235
209,852154 210,780726 236
210,829932 211,718594 237
212,027211 214,442404 238
214,49161 216,737188 239
216,706576 217,964399 240
218,851701 221,147166 241
221,515646 222,43424 242
223,042177 224,589342 243
224,778231 228,211111 244
228,569615 230,875057 245
231,053968 232,311791 246
233,65805 237,539909 247
237,768707 239,036508 248
238,985941 240,89229 249
241,170975 243,406576 250
244,13424 247,41746 251
247,556463 250,360771 252
250,54966 255,080045 253
255,199093 257,913605 254
258,002721 259,849206 255
259,988209 261,256009 256
262,642177 265,805669 257
265,894785 268,529478 258
268,927891 271,263265 259-260
271,811338 273,178912 261
273,397732 275,294104 262
275,572789 277,628798 263
278,107029 282,826984 264
283,055782 285,480952 265
285,679819 291,537188 266
291,835828 294,480499 267
294,609524 295,85737 268
296,984127 300,786168 269
300,975057 302,811565 270
303,05034 305,695011 271
306,043537 308,598413 272
309,006803 314,844218 273
315,39229 319,244218 274
319,323356 322,626531 275
323,114739 326,447846 276
326,836281 329,081859 277
329,460317 331,526304 278
332,064399 332,823356 279
333,241723 334,080499 280
334,538776 336,42517 281
336,693878 338,300907 282
338,84898 344,746259 283
345,18458 347,250567 284
348,147846 350,732653 285
351,011338 354,354422 286
354,653061 356,958503 287
357,646259 360,091383 288
360,370068 362,316327 289
362,904308 365,050113 290
365,448526 367,195238 291
369,309751 370,248299 292
After darkly looking at his leg and me several times, he came closer to my tombstone,
took me by both arms, and tilted me back as far as he could hold me;
so that his eyes looked most powerfully down into mine,
and mine looked most helplessly up into his.
«Now lookee here,»
he said,
«the question being whether you’re to be let to live.
You know what a file is?»
«Yes, sir.»
«And you know what wittles is?»
«Yes, sir.»
After each question he tilted me over a little more,
so as to give me a greater sense of helplessness and danger.
«You get me a file.»
He tilted me again.
«And you get me wittles.»
He tilted me again.
«You bring ’em both to me.»
He tilted me again.
«Or I’ll have your heart and liver out.»
He tilted me again.
I was dreadfully frightened,
and so giddy that I clung to him with both hands,
and said,
«If you would kindly please to let me keep upright,
sir,
perhaps I shouldn’t be sick,
and perhaps I could attend more.»
He gave me a most tremendous dip and roll, so that the church jumped over its own weather-cock.
Then, he held me by the arms, in an upright position on the top of the stone,
and went on in these fearful terms:
«You bring me,
to-morrow morning early,
that file and them wittles.
You bring the lot to me,
at that old Battery over yonder.
You do it,
and you never dare to say a word
or dare to make a sign concerning your having seen such a person as me,
or any person sumever,
and you shall be let to live.
You fail,
or you go from my words in any partickler,
no matter how small it is,
and your heart and your liver shall be tore out,
roasted and ate.
Now,
I ain’t alone,
as you may think I am.
There’s a young man hid with me,
in comparison with which young man I am a Angel.
That young man hears the words I speak.
That young man has a secret way pecooliar to himself,
of getting at a boy,
and at his heart, and at his liver.
It is in wain for a boy
to attempt to hide himself from that young man.
A boy may lock his door,
may be warm in bed,
may tuck himself up,
may draw the clothes over his head,
may think himself comfortable and safe,
but that young man will softly creep and creep his way to him
and tear him open.
I am a-keeping that young man from harming of you at the present moment,
with great difficulty.
I find it wery hard to hold that young man off of your inside.
Now,
what do you say?»
I said that I would get him the file,
and I would get him what broken bits of food I could,
and I would come to him at the Battery, early in the morning.
«Say Lord strike you dead if you don’t!»
said the man.
I said so,
and he took me down.
«Now,»
he pursued,
«you remember what you’ve undertook,
and you remember that young man,
and you get home!»
«Goo-good night, sir,»
I faltered.
«Much of that!»
said he, glancing about him over the cold wet flat.
«I wish I was a frog.
Or a eel!»
At the same time, he hugged his shuddering body in both his arms —
clasping himself,
as if to hold himself together —
and limped towards the low church wall.
As I saw him go, picking his way among the nettles,
and among the brambles that bound the green mounds,
he looked in my young eyes as if he were eluding the hands of the dead people,
stretching up cautiously out of their graves,
to get a twist upon his ankle
and pull him in.
When he came to the low church wall, he got over it,
like a man whose legs were numbed and stiff,
and then turned round to look for me.
When I saw him turning,
I set my face towards home,
and made the best use of my legs.
But presently I looked over my shoulder, and saw him going on again towards the river,
still hugging himself in both arms,
and picking his way with his sore feet among the great stones dropped into the marshes here and there,
for stepping-places when the rains were heavy,
or the tide was in.
The marshes were just a long black horizontal line then,
as I stopped to look after him;
and the river was just another horizontal line,
not nearly so broad nor yet so black;
and the sky was just a row of long angry red lines and dense black lines intermixed.
On the edge of the river I could faintly make out the only two black things
in all the prospect that seemed to be standing upright;
one of these was the beacon by which the sailors steered —
like an unhooped cask upon a pole —
an ugly thing when you were near it;
the other
a gibbet,
with some chains hanging to it
which had once held a pirate.
The man was limping on towards this latter, as if he were the pirate come to life, and come down,
and going back to hook himself up again.
It gave me a terrible turn when I thought so;
and as I saw the cattle lifting their heads to gaze after him,
I wondered whether they thought so too.
I looked all round for the horrible young man,
and could see no signs of him.
But, now I was frightened again,
and ran home without stopping.
End of chapter
Он несколько раз переводил хмурый взгляд со своей ноги на меня и обратно, потом подошел ко мне вплотную,
взял за плечи и запрокинул назад сколько мог дальше,
так что его глаза испытующе глядели на меня сверху вниз,
а мои растерянно глядели на него снизу вверх.
— Теперь слушай меня, —
сказал он,
— и помни, что я еще не решил, оставить тебя в живых или нет.
Что такое подпилок, ты знаешь?
— Да, сэр.
— А что такое жратва, знаешь?
— Да, сэр.
После каждого вопроса он легонько встряхивал меня,
чтобы я лучше чувствовал грозящую мне опасность и полную свою беспомощность.
— Ты мне достанешь подпилок. —
Он тряхнул меня.
— И достанешь жратвы. —
Он снова тряхнул меня.
— И принесешь все сюда. —
Он снова тряхнул меня.
— Не то я вырву у тебя сердце с печенкой. —
Он снова тряхнул меня.
Я был до смерти перепуган,
и голова у меня так кружилась, что я вцепился в него обеими руками
и сказал:
— Пожалуйста, не трясите меня,
сэр,
тогда меня, может, не будет тошнить
и я лучше пойму.
Он так запрокинул меня назад, что церковь перескочила через свою флюгарку.
Потом выпрямил одним рывком и, все еще держа за плечи,
заговорил страшнее прежнего:
— Ты принесешь мне,
завтра чуть свет,
подпилок и жратвы.
И побольше,
вон туда, к старой батарее.
Если принесешь,
и никому ни слова не скажешь,
и виду не подашь, что встретил меня
или кого другого,
тогда, так и быть, живи.
А не принесешь
или отступишь от моих слов
хоть вот на столько,
тогда вырвут у тебя сердце с печенкой,
зажарят и съедят.
И
я не один,
как ты мог подумать.
У меня тут спрятан один приятель,
так я по сравнению с ним просто ангел.
Этот мой приятель слышит все, что я тебе говорю.
У этого моего приятеля свой секрет есть,
как добраться до мальчишки,
и до сердца его, и до печенки.
Мальчишке бесполезно
пытаться спрятаться от него.
Мальчишка и дверь запрет,
и в постель залезет,
и подвернется одеялом,
и с головой укроется,
и будет думать, что вот, мол, ему тепло и хорошо и никто его не тронет,
а мой приятель тихонько к нему подберется,
да и зарежет!..
Мне и сейчас-то, чтобы он на тебя не бросился,
знаешь, как трудно сделать.
Я его еле держу, до того ему не терпится тебя сцапать.
Ну,
что ты теперь скажешь?
Я сказал, что достану ему подпилок,
и еды достану, сколько найдется,
и принесу на батарею, рано утром.
— Повтори за мной: «Разрази меня бог, если вру», —
сказал человек.
Я повторил,
и он снял меня с камня.
— А теперь, —
сказал он,
— не забудь, что обещал,
и про того моего приятеля не забудь,
и беги домой.
— П-покойной ночи, сэр, —
пролепетал я.
— Покойной! —
сказал он, окидывая взглядом холодную мокрую равнину.
— Где уж тут! В лягушку бы, что ли, превратиться.
Либо в угря.
Он крепко обхватил обеими руками свое дрожащее тело,
словно опасаясь,
что оно развалится,
и заковылял к низкой церковной ограде.
Он продирался сквозь крапиву,
сквозь репейник, окаймлявший зеленые холмики,
а детскому моему воображению представлялось, что он увертывается от мертвецов,
которые бесшумно протягивают руки из могил,
чтобы схватить его
и утащить к себе, под землю.
Он дошел до низкой церковной ограды, тяжело перелез через нее, —
видно было, что ноги у него затекли и онемели, —
а потом оглянулся на меня.
Когда я увидел его поворачивающимся
повернул к дому
и пустился наутек.
Но, пробежав немного, я оглянулся: он шел к реке,
все так же обхватив себя за плечи
и осторожно ступая сбитыми ногами между камней, набросанных на болотах,
чтобы можно было проходить по ним после затяжных дождей
или во время прилива.
Болота тянулись передо мною длинной черной полосой,
когда я перестал смотреть ему вслед,
и река за ними тоже тянулась полосой,
только поуже и посветлее;
а в небе длинные кроваво-красные полосы перемежались с густо-черными.
На берегу реки глаз мой едва различал единственные два черных предмета,
во всем ландшафте устремленных вверх:
один из них, маяк, по которому держали курс корабли, —
словно бочка, надетая на шест,
очень безобразный, если подойти к нему поближе;
другой,
виселица
с обрывками цепей,
на которой некогда был повешен пират.
Человек ковылял прямо к виселице, словно тот самый пират воскрес из мертвых и, прогулявшись,
теперь возвращался, чтобы снова прицепить себя на старое место.
Мысль эта привела меня в содрогание;
заметив, что коровы подняли головы и задумчиво смотрят ему вслед,
я спросил себя, не кажется ли им то же самое.
Я огляделся, ища глазами кровожадного приятеля моего незнакомца,
но ничего подозрительного не обнаружил.
Однако страх снова овладел мною,
и я, уже не останавливаясь больше, побежал домой.
Конец главы
1.2. Что такое напильник и жратва знаешь?

Добавить комментарий