1.1. Меня стали называть Пипом | BookTitres.com

0,388889 2 1
2,484127 3,911565 3
4,290023 5,198639 4
8,081406 10,267120 5
10,396145 12,082993 6-7
12,421542 16,692517 8
16,861451 17,271202 9
17,919048 19,805442 10
20,064172 21,790930 11-12
22,708163 28,246259 14
28,664626 30,042177 15
30,061451 31,309297 16
31,907256 34,192744 18
34,112245 36,677098 19
37,045578 39,999546 20
40,248299 42,613605 21
42,712698 45,596825 22
45,995238 48,320635 23
48,240136 51,423583 24
51,712245 52,610884 25
52,630159 53,957823 26
54,675510 57,310204 27
57,728571 60,453061 28
61,120862 65,072562 29
65,710431 67,995918 30
68,134921 70,081179 31
70,040590 73,194104 32
73,532653 76,765986 33
77,334014 81,794558 34
82,502268 85,815420 35
85,984354 90,015873 36
90,114966 92,979138 37
94,145805 97,219501 38
97,308617 98,117460 39
98,056916 99,474376 40
99,693197 101,200454 41
101,918141 110,050340 42
110,708163 116,665306 43
117,093651 118,451247 44-45
118,789796 120,187302 46
120,416100 123,100680 47
123,419274 124,567347 48
125,105442 126,423129 49
126,542177 127,670295 50
127,769388 128,717914 51
128,797052 130,553741 52
130,962132 133,028118 53
133,446485 135,233107 54
135,471882 138,565533 55
138,814286 141,848073 56
142,096825 144,043084 57
144,391610 145,729252 58
146,137642 149,281179 59
149,809297 153,790930 60
153,750340 154,499320 61
155,157143 158,679819 62
158,679138 160,116553 63
160,624717 161,343764 64
162,680045 164,566440 65
164,815193 170,453061 66
170,691837 172,947392 67
172,946712 174,763265 68
175,929932 177,127891 69
177,157143 178,794104 70
179,112698 180,939229 71
181,407483 183,034467 72
183,103628 186,706122 73
187,314059 190,507483 74
190,646485 192,433107 75
192,462358 194,069388 76
194,128571 195,815420 77
195,924490 197,751020 78
197,969841 198,838549 79
198,897732 199,796372 80
199,745805 200,694331 81
200,643764 201,811791 82
202,040590 205,533333 83
206,670068 207,249433 84
207,268707 209,025397 85
209,284127 210,671655 86
211,109977 212,756916 87
213,604308 215,171429 88
215,340363 216,248980 89
216,517687 217,296599 90
218,203855 219,152381 91
220,139456 221,696599 92
221,815646 223,821769 93
224,130385 225,567800 94
226,884127 227,283900 96
227,881859 228,830385 97
229,727664 231,713832 98
232,002494 232,990930 99
233,279592 235,036281 100
236,023356 238,029478 101
238,058730 241,541497 102
241,670522 243,566893 103
244,134921 248,246259 104
248,365306 249,992290 105
250,390703 252,756009 106
253,164399 255,030839 107
255,548980 259,829932 108
260,447846 262,653515 109
263,231519 265,317460 110
265,426531 266,375057 111
266,414286 268,629932 112
268,828798 271,393651 113
272,300907 273,947846 114
274,116780 276,122902 115
276,311791 278,587302 116
279,584354 281,410884 117
281,460091 285,002721 118
285,191610 286,289796 119
287,576190 289,731973 121
289,791156 292,505669 122
292,953968 295,708390 123
296,954875 299,569615 125
299,658730 302,592744 126
302,981179 305,136961 127
305,365760 307,870748 128
308,259184 309,956009 129
309,965306 310,993651 130
311,421995 312,939229 131
313,946259 314,934694 132
315,203401 316,042177 133
316,909524 318,875737 134
319,094558 321,260317 135
322,776190 323,724717 136
324,023356 325,530612 137
325,968934 327,476190 138
327,445578 328,543764 139
329,131746 329,860771 140
330,089569 331,646712 141
332,095011 335,098866 142
336,155782 337,084354 143
337,253288 338,141950 144
338,670068 339,538776 145
339,578005 341,005442 146
341,723129 342,811338 147
343,249660 344,327891 148
344,277324 345,195918 149
346,003401 347,630385 150
347,769388 352,658957 151
353,975283 355,203175 152
355,491837 356,959184 153
357,257823 359,752834 154
360,620181 362,376871 155
362,695465 363,534240 156
363,523583 365,130612 157
Great Expectations
by Charles Dickens
Chapter 1
My father’s family name being Pirrip,
and my Christian name Philip,
my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than
Pip.
So, I called myself Pip,
and came to be called Pip.
I give Pirrip as my father’s family name, on the authority of his tombstone and my sister —
Mrs. Joe Gargery,
who married the blacksmith.
As I never saw my father or my mother,
and never saw any likeness of either of them
(for their days were long before the days of photographs),
my first fancies regarding what they were like,
were unreasonably derived from their tombstones.
The shape of the letters on my father’s,
gave me an odd idea that he was a square, stout,
dark man,
with curly black hair.
From the character and turn of the inscription,
«Also Georgiana Wife of the Above,»
I drew a childish conclusion that my mother was freckled and sickly.
To five little stone lozenges,
each about a foot and a half long,
which were arranged in a neat row beside their grave,
and were sacred to the memory of five little brothers of mine —
who gave up trying to get a living, exceedingly early in that universal struggle —
I am indebted for a belief I religiously entertained
that they had all been born on their backs with their hands in their trousers-pockets,
and had never taken them out in this state of existence.
Ours was the marsh country, down by the river,
within,
as the river wound,
twenty miles of the sea.
My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things, seems to me to have been gained on a memorable raw afternoon towards evening.
At such a time I found out for certain, that this bleak place overgrown with nettles was the churchyard;
and that Philip Pirrip,
late of this parish,
and also Georgiana wife of the above,
were dead and buried;
and that Alexander,
Bartholomew,
Abraham,
Tobias, and Roger,
infant children of the aforesaid,
were also dead and buried;
and that the dark flat wilderness beyond the churchyard,
intersected with dykes and mounds and gates,
with scattered cattle feeding on it,
was the marshes;
and that the low leaden line beyond, was the river;
and that the distant savage lair from which the wind was rushing, was
the sea;
and that the small bundle of shivers growing afraid of it all
and beginning to cry,
was Pip.
«Hold your noise!»
cried a terrible voice, as a man started up from among the graves at the side of the church porch.
«Keep still, you little devil,
or I’ll cut your throat!»
A fearful man,
all in coarse grey,
with a great iron on his leg.
A man with no hat,
and with broken shoes, and with an old rag tied round his head.
A man who had been soaked in water, and smothered in mud,
and lamed by stones,
and cut by flints,
and stung by nettles,
and torn by briars;
who limped,
and shivered,
and glared
and growled;
and whose teeth chattered in his head as he seized me by the chin.
«O!
Don’t cut my throat, sir,»
I pleaded in terror.
«Pray don’t do it, sir.»
«Tell us your name!»
said the man.
«Quick!»
«Pip, sir.»
«Once more,»
said the man, staring at me.
«Give it mouth!»
«Pip.
Pip, sir.»
«Show us where you live,»
said the man.
«Pint out the place!»
I pointed to where our village lay,
on the flat in-shore among the alder-trees and pollards,
a mile or more from the church.
The man, after looking at me for a moment, turned me upside down,
and emptied my pockets.
There was nothing in them but a piece of bread.
When the church came to itself —
for he was so sudden and strong that he made it go head over heels before me,
and I saw the steeple under my feet —
when the church came to itself,
I say,
I was seated on a high tombstone,
trembling, while he ate the bread ravenously.
«You young dog,»
said the man, licking his lips,
«what fat cheeks you ha’ got.»
I believe they were fat,
though I was at that time undersized for my years,
and not strong.
«Darn me if I couldn’t eat em,»
said the man, with a threatening shake of his head,
«and if I han’t half a mind to’t!»
I earnestly expressed my hope that he wouldn’t,
and held tighter to the tombstone on which he had put me;
partly, to keep myself upon it;
partly, to keep myself from crying.
«Now lookee here!»
said the man.
«Where’s your mother?»
«There, sir!»
said I.
He started, made a short run,
and stopped and looked over his shoulder.
«There, sir!»
I timidly explained.
«Also Georgiana.
That’s my mother.»
«Oh!»
said he, coming back.
«And is that your father alonger your mother?»
«Yes, sir,»
said I;
«him too;
late of this parish.»
«Ha!»
he muttered then,
considering.
«Who d’ye live with —
supposin’ you’re kindly let to live, which I han’t made up my mind about?»
«My sister, sir —
Mrs. Joe Gargery —
wife of Joe Gargery, the blacksmith, sir.»
«Blacksmith, eh?»
said he.
And looked down at his leg.
Большие надежды
Чарльз Диккенс
Глава I
Фамилия моего отца была Пиррип,
мне дали при крещении имя Филип,
а так как из того и другого мой младенческий язык не мог слепить ничего более внятного,
чем Пип,
то я называл себя Пипом,
а потом и все меня стали так называть.
О том, что отец мой носил фамилию Пиррип, мне достоверно известно из надписи на его могильной плите, а также со слов моей сестры
миссис Джо Гарджери,
которая вышла замуж за кузнеца.
Оттого, что я никогда не видел ни отца, ни матери,
ни каких-либо их портретов
(о фотографии в те времена и не слыхивали),
моё первое представление о родителях
странным образом связалось с их могильными плитами.
По форме букв на могиле отца
я почему-то решил, что он был плотный и широкоплечий,
смуглый,
с черными курчавыми волосами.
Надпись
«А также Джорджиана, супруга вышереченного»
вызывала в моем детском воображении образ матери — хилой, веснушчатой женщины.
пять узеньких каменных надгробий,
каждое фута в полтора длиной,
аккуратно расположенные в ряд возле их могилы
под которыми покоились пять моих маленьких братцев,
рано отказавшихся от попыток уцелеть во всеобщей борьбе,
породили во мне твердую уверенность,
что все они появились на свет, лежа навзничь и спрятав руки в карманы штанишек,
откуда и не вынимали их за все время своего пребывания на земле.
Мы жили в болотистом крае близ большой реки,
в пределах
от ее впадения в море
в двадцати милях .
Вероятно, свое первое сознательное впечатление от окружающего меня широкого мира я получил в один памятный зимний день, уже под вечер.
Именно тогда мне впервые стало ясно, что это унылое место, обнесенное оградой и густо заросшее крапивой, — кладбище;
что Филип Пиррип,
житель сего прихода,
а также Джорджиана, супруга вышереченного,
умерли и похоронены;
что Александер,
Бартоломью,
Абраам,
Тобиас и Роджер,
малолетние сыновья их, младенцы
тоже умерли и похоронены;
что плоская темная даль за оградой,
вся изрезанная дамбами, плотинами и шлюзами,
среди которых кое-где пасется скот, —
это болота;
что замыкающая их свинцовая полоска — река;
далекое логово, где родится свирепый ветер, —
море;
а маленькое дрожащее существо, что затерялось среди всего этого
и плачет от страха, —
Пип.
— А ну, замолчи! —
раздался грозный окрик, и среди могил, возле паперти, внезапно вырос человек.
— Не ори, чертенок,
не то я тебе горло перережу!
Страшный человек
в грубой серой одежде,
с тяжелой цепью на ноге!
Человек без шапки,
в разбитых башмаках,
голова обвязана какой-то тряпкой. Человек, который, как видно, мок в воде и полз по грязи,
сбивал ноги о камни,
порезался кремневой галькой,
которого жгла крапива
и рвал терновник!
Он хромал
и трясся,
таращил глаза
и хрипел
и вдруг, громко стуча зубами, схватил меня за подбородок.
— Ой,
не режьте меня, сэр! —
в ужасе взмолился я. —
Пожалуйста, сэр, не надо!
— Как тебя звать? —
спросил человек. —
Ну, живо!
— Пип, сэр.
— Как, как? —
переспросил человек, сверля меня глазами.
— Повтори.
— Пип.
Пип, сэр.
— Где ты живешь? —
спросил человек.
— Покажи!
Я указал пальцем туда, где лежала наша деревня
на плоской прибрежной низине, среди ольхи и ветел
в доброй миле от церкви.
Посмотрев на меня с минуту, человек перевернул меня вниз головой
и вытряс мои карманы.
В них ничего не было, кроме куска хлеба.
Когда церковь стала на место, —
а он был до того ловкий и сильный, что разом опрокинул ее вверх тормашками,
так что колокольня очутилась у меня под ногами, —
так вот, когда церковь стала на место,
оказалось,
что я сижу на высоком могильном камне,
дрожа, а он пожирает мой хлеб.
— Ух ты, щенок, —
сказал человек, облизываясь. —
Надо же, какие толстые щеки!
Возможно, что они и правда были толстые,
хотя я в ту пору был невелик для своих лет
и не отличался крепким сложением.
— Так бы вот и съел их, —
сказал человек и яростно мотнул головой,
— а может, черт подери, я и взаправду их съем.
Я очень серьезно его попросил не делать этого
и крепче ухватился за могильный камень, на который он меня посадил, —
отчасти для того, чтобы не свалиться,
отчасти для того, чтобы сдержать слезы.
— Слышь ты, —
сказал человек.
— Где твоя мать?
— Здесь, сэр, —
сказал я.
Он вздрогнул и кинулся было бежать,
потом, остановившись, оглянулся через плечо.
— Вот здесь, сэр, —
робко пояснил я. —
«Также Джорджиана».
Это моя мать.
— А-а, —
сказал он, возвращаясь.
— А это, рядом с матерью, твой отец?
— Да, сэр, —
сказал я.
— Он тоже здесь:
«Житель сего прихода».
— Так, —
протянул он
и помолчал.
— С кем же ты живешь,
или, вернее сказать, с кем жил, потому что я не решил еще, оставить тебя в живых или нет.
— С сестрой, сэр.
Миссис Джо Гарджери.
Она жена кузнеца, сэр.
— Кузнеца, говоришь? —
переспросил он.
И посмотрел на свою ногу.
1.1. Меня стали называть Пипом

Добавить комментарий